Sex Drive Intensity Is Reflected In The Dimensions Of Our Faces

couple-DaliborTomic-flickr.jpg

For those who have wondered about the role facial features play in sexual attraction and partner selection, a study out of Nipissing University in Canada provides some answers.

The Canadian researchers, led by Steven Arnocky, found that males and females with shorter, wider faces are generally more sexually motivated, and have greater sex drives than individuals with other face shapes.

Earlier studies showed that specific behavioral and mental characteristics are equated with certain facial width-to-height ratios (FWHR). For instance, men with a high FWHR - indicating a square face - are typically seen as being more dominant, aggressive, and immoral, and more appealing as short-term sexual partners than men with thinner, longer faces.

Differences in testosterone levels during developmental stages, such as puberty, are considered by investigators to account for variations in facial proportions. Testosterone also helps form sexual aspirations and attitudes in adults.

Arnocky and his colleagues conducted two separate, but related studies. For the first study, questionnaires pertaining to interpersonal behavior and sex drive were completed by 145 undergraduates in romantic relationships. Photographs of the participants were used to measure their FWHR.

The second similar study, involving 314 students, examined participants' sexual orientation, perceptions of infidelity, and their comfort level with casual sex that does not involve commitment, or love.

The research data showed that FWHR is a useful predictor for the intensity of sexuality in both men and women. People of either sex with high FWHR, or square and wide faces, reported having a stronger sex drive than those with other face configurations.

Further, the study revealed that men with larger FWHR are also more easygoing than other face types about casual sex, and were more likely to consider cheating on their partners.

“Together, these findings suggest that facial characteristics might convey important information about human sexual motivations,” said Arnocky.

Source: Springer
Photo credit: Dalibor Tomic


 
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